Microsoft’s Azure Modular Datacenter: What’s ‘special clouds’ got to do with it?


Credit: Microsoft

Announced last fall, Azure Modular Datacenter, or MDC, is basically an Azure datacenter in a shipping container, delivered to remote locations on a truck bed. It’s running Azure Stack Hub (for now) and can run disconnected or connected via satellite. Beyond the datacenter device itself, Azure MDC is interesting for a number of reasons.

When Microsoft announced MDC last October, many readers and commentators wondered why Microsoft was taking another stab at the idea of Azure in a container. After all, Microsoft had been dabbling with Azure in shipping containers since 2008 — a couple of years after other tech companies like Sun Microsystems (with “Project Blackbox” back in 2006) had been pushing forward with the datacenter-in-a container concept.

Microsoft’s Bill Karagounis, who these days is General Manager, Azure Global Industry Sovereign Solutions,  supplied the following answer to that question:

“Containerized solutions in the past required operators

Read More

AWS cuts off Parler, CEO aims to rebuild infrastructure

Amazon Web Services will cut off Parler servers, according to the social network’s CEO John Matze.

The move comes after Google and Apple also banned the social app citing a violation of terms. Apple also cited a lack of moderation. It’s unclear what hosting option Parler will be able to use. AWS is the largest cloud provider with Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform No. 2 and No. 3, respectively. 

Parler’s platform has been seen as a way to organize the Capitol Hill riot on Wednesday. Following the attack, President Trump was deplatformed from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social networking venues. CNET has been rounding up the aftermath of the Capitol Hill riot as have other news outlets

In a post on Parler Saturday, Matze said:

Sunday (tomorrow) at midnight Amazon will be shutting off all of our servers in an attempt to completely remove free speech

Read More

‘Litany’ of UK government failures in gigabit broadband roll-out

In a scathing criticism of the ability of the UK government, the UK’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has slammed the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) for a mass of general failures in its plans to roll out gigabit-capable broadband by 2025, further warning of digital inequality compounding the economic inequality “harshly” exposed by Covid-19.

Just after the Conservatives’ General Election victory in December 2019, the government outlined plans to make good on prime minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to work towards “delivering full-fibre [broadband] to every home in the land” by 2025, and then chancellor Sajid Javid committed £5bn of public funding to “support the roll-out of full-fibre, 5G and other gigabit-capable networks to the hardest-to-reach 20% of the country.”

However, by November 2020, the UK government began backtracking on its ambitious targets. When announcing his Spending Review in late November 2020, chancellor Rishi Sunak confirmed that

Read More

Bangalore-based Jumbotail, an online wholesale marketplace for grocery and food items, adds $14.2M to its Series B, bringing total for the round to about $44M (Manish Singh/TechCrunch)


Manish Singh / TechCrunch:

Bangalore-based Jumbotail, an online wholesale marketplace for grocery and food items, adds $14.2M to its Series B, bringing total for the round to about $44M  —  Jumbotail, an online wholesale marketplace for grocery and food items, said on Friday it has raised an additional $14.2 million … … Read More